Mussels: the tree of the sea

Mussels: the tree of the sea

The mussel lends itself to a thousand recipes, it is well known, and it loves French fries – and so do the Belgians (!). But there are several other possibilities with the ingredients below, not to mention the fact that, when it is a bit iodized, this flavour...
TOMATO: Like a flower

TOMATO: Like a flower

Only about fifteen of the 400 or so aromatic organic compounds that make up the hundred or so varieties of tomatoes are actually perceived by humans. Moreover, its aromatic structure with green and vegetal notes gives the tomato a profile similar to that of sauvignon...
IBERIAN HAMS: A range of flavours

IBERIAN HAMS: A range of flavours

The great family of Spanish hams, to which the Serrano and the Iberian belong, develop aromas of mushroom and terpene aromas due to the external molds produced during aging. Complementary Ingredients Apricot Roasted almond Red beetroot Dried fig Black olive Reblochon...
COCONUT: SWEET OR SALTY ?

COCONUT: SWEET OR SALTY ?

Raw coconut, like its milk, is rich in lactones (a family of aromatic compounds). When roasted, it is marked by the world of pyrazines (compounds found in roasted foods and barrel-aged wines). During the Second World War, due to a shortage of serum, the wounded were...
CUCUMBER: GIN LOVER

CUCUMBER: GIN LOVER

Did you know that the dominant flavour compound in cucumber is the same as that found in Hendrick’s British gin? You need to have tried a Hendrick’s cucumber martini to understand how beautiful and compelling this synergy is, as it is with tequila....
Dark beer: NOT ONLY HIGH IN ALCOHOL %

Dark beer: NOT ONLY HIGH IN ALCOHOL %

High-fermentation beers, which can be high in alcohol content, contain compounds that play a role in the same aroma world as oak-aged wines and barbecued foods. This is because maltol (a burnt sugar smell), an organic compound found in oak and some foods, including...